PZ i love you

by Persia Zarrabi

Charlie noor's Birth story

On August 1, 2017, I went to my 40-week checkup, where my OB told me that I was only 1 cm dilated. From what he saw on his exam, he wasn’t optimistic that the baby would be coming any time soon, and he encouraged us to make an appointment for a week from that day, at which point we could start to discuss options such as induction. Later that day at home, I started having consistent contractions. They were painful but I didn’t think anything of it, based on what we had discussed at my appointment. At 3 AM I couldn’t sleep anymore because my contractions were so painful. I started timing my contractions and they were 5 minutes apart. I knew that she wasn’t coming that night so I let my husband sleep until I couldn’t handle the pain anymore. I woke him up at 6:30 AM. We got to the hospital, where they did another exam; after all those hours of contractions I was 1.5 cm dilated. The baby still hadn’t “dropped”, meaning she wasn’t in a favorable position to give birth, so they wanted me to go on a walk for an hour and check back in, at which point they would decide on if I needed to be admitted to the hospital or if I could go home and labor there before returning to the hospital. We walked to Verve, one of our favorite coffee shops in West Hollywood, and had what ended up being the final breakfast with just the two of us.

When we returned to the hospital about two hours later, I was 2 cm dilated, but they chose to admit us because of the amount of pain I was having with my contractions. They moved us to a delightful room with windows and a view of the Hollywood sign, where it did not take very long before we got settled in, and I got my epidural. Almost instantly, I was on cloud nine. About thirty minutes after I got the epidural I could no longer feel my contractions at all, but the monitor they had me on continued to show regular strong contractions every 4-5 minutes. At 6 PM, my OB stopped by our room to see how I was doing and check how my labor was progressing, to his utter surprise I was now fully dilated, and almost ready to start pushing. He wanted me to “labor down” for about an hour, where they had me sit in the “throne” position in the hospital bed (pictured below), this was to help optimize the position our baby was in. We started pushing at 7:30 PM and Charlie was born at 10:06 PM.

Throne position

When they handed me Charlie, I felt like my world was complete. She was the most perfect thing I have every laid my eyes on. I opted to do skin to skin and she breast fed immediately. Charlie knew exactly what she was doing, and she was nursing within the first few minutes after birth.

One of the things I had considered at one point, but ultimately decided against was eating my placenta. I read studies that show that it could carry bacteria, and often times the capsulation process where they make your placenta pills aren’t particularly sterile. My OB said if I really wanted to eat my placenta I should dehydrate it myself at home in my oven since that’s pretty much what the people that make the pills do… someone takes it home dehydrates it in their oven, and puts it in capsules. Nothing against anyone that does it but it wasn’t something I was interested in doing. One of the things I did do research on, and ended up doing, was holding off on washing Charlie for the first 24 hours of life. The benefits of not washing the vernix seemed to outweigh the negatives. Vernix forms an anti-germ barrier that reduces risk of infection, it is also one of nature’s most potent moisturizers.

Charlie's first bath

Being a patient in the hospital that my husband works at also helped give me an appreciation for what it really is that he does. My husband is an anesthesiologist and I found this so helpful during my hospital stay. He knew some insider tips and tricks that really helped streamline the process for me and make me as comfortable as could be along the way. I asked him to share some of those tips, and here is what he had to say:

-If they can find a good vein, try to have your IV placed somewhere above your wrist but below your elbow on your non-dominant arm. Your IV is likely going to stay in for a few days and this will be the most comfortable thing for you. IVs in the hand or in the crease of the elbow prevent you from bending your wrist/elbow.

*Bonus, if they can do it where you are at have them give you a lidocaine skin wheal before placing the IV…this will make it be about as painless as it gets.

-If you are going the epidural route, there’s no need to have stress/anxiety about it before hand. From my experience getting the epidural is about as uncomfortable as having your IV placed, and women almost universally prefer either of those to the labor contraction pains. The epidural medications do take about 30 minutes to really start working, and it usually takes around 15 minutes for the anesthesiologist to set up before placing it, so give yourself enough time to ensure you aren’t uncomfortable for too long.

-You will only be allowed to have clear liquids (water, juice, jello), once you get to the hospital for safety reasons, so it might not be a bad idea to have some kind of snack before you get to the hospital, time permitting.

SEND

.................................................................

.................................................................

.................................................................

.................................................................

CONTACT

SEND

.................................................................

.................................................................

.................................................................

.................................................................

CONTACT

CONTACT

BLOG

HOME

HAVE A LOOK AROUND...

CONTACT

@persiasharifat